Last edited by Dojar
Friday, October 9, 2020 | History

6 edition of Deregulation of cable television found in the catalog.

Deregulation of cable television

  • 365 Want to read
  • 14 Currently reading

Published by American Enterprise Institute for Public Policy Research in Washington .
Written in English

    Places:
  • United States.
    • Subjects:
    • Cable television -- Deregulation -- United States.,
    • Cable television -- Law and legislation -- United States.

    • Edition Notes

      Includes bibliographical references.

      Statementedited by Paul W. MacAvoy.
      SeriesStudies in government regulation, Ford administration papers on regulatory reform, AEI studies ; 156, AEI studies ;, 156.
      ContributionsMacAvoy, Paul W.
      Classifications
      LC ClassificationsHE8700.7.C6 D47
      The Physical Object
      Pagination169 p. ;
      Number of Pages169
      ID Numbers
      Open LibraryOL4565136M
      ISBN 100844732540
      LC Control Number77079871
      OCLC/WorldCa3047094

        Over much of the past three decades, the cable television industry has undergone numerous episodes of regulation and deregulation. Hazlett and Spitzer do an excellent job of telling the story of the regulatory impact on the industry and of the effects on consumer welfare of price controls in cable television.   Government attempts to regulate the cable industry began in the s when federal regulators enacted rules to block cable television operations in large markets to protect broadcast television from upstart competitors. 44 These rules were later overturned in the s as cable grew in popularity across America. 45 More deregulation ensued in.

      Deregulation of the cable television industry nationwide, which went into effect Jan. 1, is expected to have less impact on prices paid for cable service in the San Fernando Valley area than in.   Charter argued that AT&T’s TV Now streaming service is a competitor to cable, and it should be allowed to raise prices. The Federal Communications Commission, surprisingly, agreed.

      As cable television developed, its prices were largely regulated by local governments. With deregulation moves in the mids, prices began to jump. In the early s, regulations were imposed again. The massive Telecommunications Act of compelled Congress to ease most oversight and regulations on rates. the air.9 These rules applied to broadcast TV and radio, but not to cable or satellite. In , in Red Lion Broadcasting Co. v. FCC, the Supreme Court ruled that the Fairness Doctrine was consti- tutional, concluding that the print and broadcast media were inherently different in .


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Report of the Antitrust Subcommittee (Subcommittee No. 5) of the Committee on the Judiciary, House of Representatives, Eighty-fifth Congress, first session, pursuant to H. Res. 107, authorizing the Committee on the Judiciary to conduct studies and investigations relating to certain matters within its jurisdiction on airlines.

Report of the Antitrust Subcommittee (Subcommittee No. 5) of the Committee on the Judiciary, House of Representatives, Eighty-fifth Congress, first session, pursuant to H. Res. 107, authorizing the Committee on the Judiciary to conduct studies and investigations relating to certain matters within its jurisdiction on airlines.

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Deregulation of cable television Download PDF EPUB FB2

Deregulation of cable television (Studies in government regulation) Paperback – January 1, by Paul W. MacAvoy (Author) See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions. Price New from Used from Paperback "Please retry" $ — $ Paperback $ Cited by: 4.

In this book, Robert Crandall and Harold Furchtgott-Roth examine the case of reregulating cable television and find that viewers gained far more than they lost during the brief deregulatory era because cable services expanded so rapidly in the deregulated by: Deregulation of cable television.

[Paul W MacAvoy;] Home. WorldCat Home About WorldCat Help. Search. Search for Library Items Search for Lists Search for Book: All Authors / Contributors: Paul W MacAvoy. Find more information about: ISBN: OCLC Number. This book examines the case of reregulating cable television and shows that viewers gained far more than they lost during the brief deregulatory era because cable services expanded so rapidly in.

CABLE TELEVISION, REGULATION OFTelevision has proven to be one of the most powerful media of all time. Newspapers, magazines, radio, and the Internet have made substantial contributions to the sharing of ideas and providing entertainment, but none was so immediately pervasive and hypnotic as "the tube," which is able to deliver breaking news and weather, movies, concerts, and sporting events.

Book: All Authors / Contributors: Robert W Crandall; Harold W Furchtgott-Roth. Find more information about: ISBN: OCLC Number: Notes: # Cable television--Deregulation\/span>\n \u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\n schema.

That's why he and other FCC commissioners battled so tirelessly to prevent cable television from intruding on broadcast television's monopoly. Television FCC Deregulation Book Reviews. Media.

Fowler achieved many of his goals with the passage of the Cable Communications Policy Act of This act effectively completed the deregulation of the cable TV industry and placed it on equal footing with broadcast TV.

The act eliminated must-carry rules, so that cable systems were no longer required to carry local broadcast stations. A briefing on cable TV programming, held by the National Cable Television Association, outlined the effects of recent changes in the cable regulations.

Today, cable industry representatives from. Cable television first became available in the United States in Data by SNL Kagan shows that as of about % of all American homes subscribe to basic cable television services.

[needs update] Most cable viewers in the U.S. reside in the suburbs and tend to be middle class; cable television is less common in low income, urban, and rural areas. The Telecommunications Act of was the first significant overhaul of telecommunications law in more than sixty years, amending the Communications Act of The Act, signed by President Bill Clinton, represented a major change in American telecommunication law, since it was the first time that the Internet was included in broadcasting and spectrum allotment.

The cable television industry provides an interesting case study of regulation for several reasons. First, like trucking or intrastate natural gas, the cable television industry developed as a substitute for a regulated service. Television broadcasting. Gregory S. Crawford, in Handbook of Media Economics, Pay TV Distribution.

In the US, pay television arose in the form of “ cable television.” 14 Cable TV began in the s to transmit broadcast signals to areas that could not receive them due to interference from natural features of the local terrain (e.g., mountains).

Cable systems needed access to public infrastructure. Media cross-ownership is the common ownership of multiple media sources by a single person or corporate entity. Media sources include radio, broadcast television, specialty and pay television, cable, satellite, Internet Protocol television (IPTV), newspapers, magazines and periodicals, music, film, book publishing, video games, search engines, social media, internet service providers, and.

To the Editor: In supporting what amounts to total deregulation of cable television, your Aug. 8 editorial ''Cable Prices Unleashed'' underestimates the enormous influence of. The Christian Science Monitor is an international news organization that delivers thoughtful, global coverage via its website, weekly magazine, online daily edition, and email newsletters.

The Deregulation of Cable Television. This paper uses financial market data to study the effects of deregulation on the expected future profitability of United States cable television system operators. The results suggest that although deregulation has enhanced the profitability of these firms, the effect was not anticipated at the time when the deregulatory legislation was passed.

Replacing the Federal Radio Commission, the FCC not only regulates radio and television broadcasting under the authority of Federal law, but telephone, telegraph, and cable television. A guideline included in the Communications Act, the Fairness Doctrine, was created to enforce restrictions on radio and television broadcasting until Northland Communications (formerly known as Northland Cable Television) was an American cable television, telephone and internet service provider with systems in various portions of the United States.

Northland Communications currently owns and operates smaller-market cable systems in Alabama, California, Georgia, Idaho, North Carolina, South Carolina, Texas and Washington. Specifically, deregulation of the telecommunications industry pertains to relaxing ownership rules regarding such items as the number of stations a single television or radio owner can possess in a market and whether or not a single corporation can own a newspaper, or television and radio station in the same market.

The cable industry has used public rights of ways to access those homes and in turn made huge profits. This report makes clear that the cable industry has not lived up to its public and civic responsibilities as holders of valuable public franchises and licenses.

Congress, the FCC, and state and local governments must examine the recommendations made in this report and take appropriate. Telecommunications executives testified on the deregulation of cable television, especially the impact of the Cable Television Act of and how it .